Women writers on alcohol and the level of hypocrisy in society

Many of my girlfriends have been part of a conversation where they were suddenly ambushed by their male peers who have asked them “Why are you getting so aggressive?”, and the same men have occasionally afforded themselves the luxury of throwing a fit of anger. After being a firsthand victim of such incidents I started gravitating towards women who stand outside of being ‘likeable’ by the society. They are, in my experience, more real and I have had some of the best, funniest, self-deprecating and most intelligent conversations with them.
Just as the feisty opinionated persona of a woman has been off-putting, for society, women writers and alcohol was rather an unpalatable topic. When writer Jane Bowles went to see her neurologist to cope with her alcohol addiction she was told to ‘go back to your pots and pans and try to cope’. Rather than validating their temperament and choice of lifestyle, even a little acknowledgement by the society, unadulterated by sexist views and stereotypes would have gone a long way. In a moment of ignorance, the neurologist dismissed Jane Bowles, a person, a writer and reduced her to just another undomesticated woman who wasn’t domesticated enough.
I have always worshipped literary geniuses like Ernest Hemingway, Woody Allen, Hunter Thompson, Van Gogh, F. Scott Fitzgerald and admired their struggle as much as their work, but the struggles and stories of women artists seemed to be airbrushed from history. Their struggles are often times dismissed as weakness in character. Although, of late, we have started recognising many female artists for their wonderful artistic and literary creations, their struggles and journey have not been as well-celebrated as that of men.
The relationship between art and drinking has been quite significant. Although some of the most successful artists are ones who have always been much disciplined, there are those who have struggled with addictions. The reality of alcoholism is ugly and there is nothing glorifying, artistically or otherwise, about vomiting and being a painful mess. There is no escaping the brutality of such an addiction.
But what is most astonishing is the unsettling aspect of society’s acceptance towards the art and literature produced by troubled artists, but a total disregard for the tortured mental anguish from where it is birthed. It’s the case of the golden egg and the goose where the world loves the beautiful creations which is equivalent to the golden egg, but would rather detach itself from the unruly, disagreeable aspects of the personalities of the golden goose that birthed such brilliance. “Something is always born of excess: great art was born of great terrors, great loneliness, great inhibitions, instabilities, and it always balances them” said Anaïs Nin, a French novelist.
ninWhen it comes to women writers and their drinking patterns the level of hypocrisy they are faced with is just surprising. Society has always condemned and shunned women that are fierce, savage, and opinionated, and rather seeks to mould women into docile little doves that they could tame to their liking. It is disturbing how the society is completely blind about these women’s work and talent, and rather focuses on the negative aspects of their personalities.
DurasJean Rhys, a Caribbean novelist, wrote in her diary that drinking helped her “see the truth, the simplicity and the primitive emotions once more”. Frida Kahlo, whose style and art will never be forgotten, downed Tequila straight from the bottle. “I drank to drown my sorrows, but the damned things learned how to swim.”
Elizabeth Bishop, who was a poet and a Pulitzer winner, heavily reclined towards the bottle and in her poem, A Drunkard, she tried to word the emotions an alcoholic gets caught into, “I have suffered from abnormal thirst – I swear it’s true – and by the age of twenty and twenty-one I had begun to drink and drink – I can’t get enough, and as much as you have noticed I’m half-drunk now”.
PlathSylvia Plath, the queen of confessional poetry, wrote, “I began to think vodka was my drink at last. It didn’t taste like anything, but it went straight down into my stomach like a sword swallowers’ sword and made me feel powerful and godlike”.
Leah Odze Epstein and her partner started the Drinking Diaries blog in 2009 exploring why female writers like to drink. She compiled some brilliant answers  through her project.
Having shared these wonderful bites what remains to be said is that for every talented intoxicated artist there have been many delusional, mediocre, intoxicated failures. It is stupid to romanticize the drug/alcohol-addled, narcissistic, self-glorifying addictions of the artistic world while the majority of great artists try hard to stay healthy so they can do what they love doing the most, for a long time – CREATE.

Creativity and frivolous ideas

I love how all the great adventures and collaborations always start with one person saying “Why don’t we <insert a ridiculous idea here> ? and the other one  going “Why Not?”

So when Howard Gossage (a nonconformist advertising genius famously known as The Socrates of San Francisco) sat with the Publisher of Scientific American in a New York Restaurant to explore some new ways to expand the magazine’s reach, he suggested having a paper plane competition for the magazine. The publishers agreed. Details aside, the 1st International Paper Airplane contest was signed off. The contest received 12,000 entries within six weeks of placing ads in local newspapers asking people to join the competition.

The results from the contest were compiled into this book – The Great International Paper Airplane Book. It also featured the winning entries with DIY instructions.

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The book explains how paper airplanes are quite different with paper darts. Darts  do not have any personality – they fly straight and that’s it.

“The paper airplane is a very different affair. It is, more accurately, a paper glider. You do not throw it. You let it go or push it very slightly; and the weight head carries it forward, gracefully and gently, like a seagull coming to rest upon the deck of a ship. A little while ago it was a sheet of notepaper, but now it glides like the fairest of white birds. Yet a perfect flight requires very often an infinitude of patience, a folding and refolding, a shaping and reshaping with the scissors.”

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Jerry Mander, George Dippel and Howard Gossage, authors of the book write, “In our experience, we have found that the biggest thinkers we have dealt with are the ones most willing to support such “frivolous”projects”

It’s important to explore our ability to go astray and come up with some really frivolous ideas.

Woven nests and the vision of a perfect society

St-Paul de Vence is such an amazing place with incredible art, antique shops, charming boutiques at every turn. I was  really amazed by the sheer number of galleries in the city, and the fact that it was home to artists that I love – Chagall, Matisse, Picasso. While this too beautiful-to-true place left me so overwhelmed what stayed with me was a beautiful nest I saw floating in isolation, hidden away below the ramparts. Apart from the creative artistry behind the project, there was a kind of comforting aspect to it. If I was not in South of France I wonder if I would ever come across this beautiful project. I really want these wonderful sculptures and the artist behind it to be known.

Kim Cao uses weaved bamboos as the only material to make his floating nests. The manner they support and intersect to form natural shapes inspired him  to create this artistic vision of the perfect society. “The bamboos are men, relying on each other to shelter something bigger, something more beautiful, some unspeakable, and invisible mystery, floating on the winds. A testimony to the grace and solidarity that we humans can show.” The beautiful thing about such art is that it does not always answer the problems faced by the society but makes us ask the right questions.

Nid Vivant - Kim Cao 2015 - 240cmWhat is the creative process behind the woven nests?
After feeling what kind of shape needs to come out, I go out and choose the materials, the thickness of the bamboo and its breed define the natural bend I can get from it.
Depending on the size of the piece, I either use the main stem or the “branches” (axillaries although I’m not sure about the English translation for this, axillary in french, can’t really speak of branches, as bamboo is a herb, like palm trees ).
 I then decide whether to weave with the whole plant, leaving the leaves to decay and eventually fall, or clean up the branches for a more geometrical render.
On some occasions, I heat up the bamboo to artificially bend it beyond its natural limits. Like steel, bamboo fiber becomes flexible when heated, then keeps its shape when cooled down.This technique is indeed tricky, as pressure and temperature have to be adjusted to the stem’s freshness/dryness. Doing so without breaking half the stems in the process takes a lot of patience, but mostly it needs attention and sensitivity, one needs to be “listening” to the bamboo, both literally and metaphorically.
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I took the time to describe precisely this process because t became obvious to me after a few years of working with this material, that I had much to realize and learn about individuals and societies, from bamboos; as individuals, we can, of course, bend beyond our limits, our balance, but we have to listen to the cracks, pops and pains during the process, otherwise we are sure to break at some point. As a society, we survive and prosper by accepting the links and the pressures that are a natural consequence to these links.
We bond with people, it makes the structure hold itself together.
When the pressure is too great for the individual to withstand, at least a piece of him/her breaks and begins its own journey. Of course, there’s no such thing as a perfect society, that’s why leaving my creations to decay and be used as a ladder for young sprouts to get to the light is an important stage of the creative process, which I adore.
Kim Cao - cocoon 2015What inspired you to create weaved bamboo nests?
The need for a shelter, I guess, and the need for a cure to overthinking 🙂 My dad was born in Vietnam and my mom is french. Growing older (and more vulnerable), I admitted lacking a sense of belonging. When you’re mixed blooded, people from either country ask you where you’re from. Hence the attention I gave to societies, big or small, my opinion is we’re all in need of that sense of belonging, and of a connection.
KIM CAO - NEST HD©Kim Cao.jpgTell us more about your vision of a perfect society. 
I wish people would listen to themselves more. To me, it all starts with listening and contemplating. In modern western society, listening to others is considered as a sign of weakness, when to me it’s the greatest sign of strength, and listening to yourself is selfishness when I call it self-alignment. How can anyone else know better than myself my feelings, and in a more general way, what defines me as an individual?
We’re taught to memorize, not feel.
We don’t know our own selves.
My opinion is, people would feel better about themselves by taking a break, breathing, listening and contemplating, and this simple act of self-love could help society into an upwards spiral. Connect, in real life, do something you like!

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How do you dismiss all the conflicting thoughts in your head and focus on the singular process of creation?
Most of the times,  it’s the overdose of thinking that leads me to empower myself by manipulating matter. My redundant thoughts are always about things I understand, but can’t change. But I can change bamboo!
Give us a sneak-peek into your typical day. How does an ‘A Day In Life of Kim’ look like?
I’m lucky enough to live in a small house with pets everywhere, and a vegetable garden.
On a typical day, I’d eat fruits and take a walk in the garden with my dog, check on the veggies and on my two beehives. Then I either work on video editing or music, or on sculptures.  I also grow a ton of experiments, like Koke Damas to include in my nests, water lentils to put in recycled lightbulbs, or moss for terrariums. I’m passionate about plants!
I’m also part of an association that promotes artists and also help people/companies install growing systems with recycled materials in homes of offices. And of another, that aims at protecting bees and related insects.
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If someone issues a search warrant through your tools and sketchbooks, what are they likely to stumble into?
Very simple sketches, as I prefer simple shapes, sometimes to help with staging or proportions.
As for tools, the main one is a good sécateur, a quick Japanese saw, a hatchet, strings of differents kinds and a small blowpipe. I also use a variety of climbing equipment to hang the pieces in between trees.
photo KIM CAO Portrait HD ©Dana Sardet
Do you have any other creative projects you are currently working on?
I’m working on an exhibition, a path in the woods I spent my childhood in, in Saint Paul de Vence, and have some other ideas in the area.
I’m passionate about storytelling, so there’s a story I wrote, a philosophical journey, of a young man looking for his roots. Maybe an audio book, child book or animated movie with this.
I’m working on a project with a polish illustrator, for an animated movie. I also love dance, a project involving cadavers acquis (exquisite corpses) with 15 dancers is under construction, I’d  like to explore mixing dance on stage with pre-captured dance videos in a yet to come project. As for sculptures, I’m exploring working with living materials, plants, mosses, maybe even ant colonies!
You can check out his website to see what’s new:
Visual art (sculpture, miniature garden and videos: http://kimcao.portfoliobox.net/

 

Creativity without biases

Biases. We all have them.

We deal with them, we silence them, but there’s no denying how much they affect our creative judgment.

Our creative journey is always filled with highs and lows — days when we feel the flow; someday nothing inspires us. Some days we hate everything around us and there are some days when everything around us inspires us.

We have bundles of stuff we go through each day – some intrigues and some inspires. Biases have the power to shape our judgment, make us see things in a new light, and can set the tone for our entire line of work.

There is a Wikipedia page for biases. Attentional bias, lesser-is-better bias, pro-innovation bias, belief bias, choice-supportive bias, confirmation bias, curse of knowledge bias, hindsight bias, illusion of control bias omission bias, optimism bias, pessimism bias, reactive devaluation bias, selective perception bias, survivorship bias, triviality bias, actor-observer bias, group attribution error, and projection bias.

Expressing a creative concept on a blank paper calls forth a mysterious meeting point for all our deep-rooted biases. Our biases – born from our constant aim for self-actualization remind us of our past while we try to create something new in the premise of something unknown and new.

These biases dismiss the distinctively new idea from being birthed or shaped on the blank page. A self-serving bias which is basically “The tendency to claim more responsibility for successes than failures” often stops us from creating more ideas that we fear might fail.

Our past shores up all the experiences and validates a new idea against various standards it has set. The standards of perfection, of being safe, of being culturally/socially right, of seeing the idea through its completion, of being the first of its kind.

History sets the context for the present. Unfortunately it also sets context to ideas that we work on and those that we don’t. While our creativity and art belong to the future, our past is already setting context to it.

Blank paper is where this confluence lies.

A number of mental processes of retrieval, association, synthesis, transformation, analogical transfer go into a creative process. Retrieval of what we have seen, earned, learned. Not that we can dismiss it. But we can reorient our ideas to see that they stand to be real and minus the flavors of our mind’s biases.

Typologies, Design Innovations and Creativity with Gianluca Gimini

I have always been fascinated with writers and illustrators’ creations on blank paper. What intrigues me is the inner conflict and the dialogue they have with the blank page before their creations come to life. So when I stumbled upon Gianluca’s project, where he rendered 50 of the bicycle sketches he collected over the past 6 years into prototype designs, I was fascinated.

What I loved about this project is that its construct permitted us to observe a designer’s awareness of aesthetics and functionality of the product designs against a non-designer’s independent, non-biased, non-aligned thought process. Maybe this is one area we must all consider for product designs and innovations.

I interviewed Gianluca for Blank Paper Project and he had some interesting insights and stories to share about his project ‘Velocipedia’.

Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (10)Gianluca: There is a quite funny story behind this project. It all started in 2009 in a bar in Bologna where I was chatting with a friend. We were talking about school time memories and I recalled this very embarrassing moment: a classmate was being questioned by our technical ed. teacher. He was doing pretty bad and was on the verge of tears at a certain point, so the teacher tried to help him out by asking him to describe his bicycle. The poor kid panicked and couldn’t even remember if the driving wheel was the front or the rear one.  My friend laughed at this story and said that anyone who has ridden a bike must know how it’s made. Then he tried drawing one on a napkin and miserably failed. That’s the day I started collecting bike drawings.

I would walk up to friends, family or total strangers with a pen and a sheet of paper in my hand, asking that they immediately draw me a men’s bicycle, by heart. Soon I found out that when confronted with this odd request most people have a very hard time remembering exactly how a bike is made. Some did get close, some actually nailed it perfectly, but most ended up drawing something that was pretty  far off from a regular men’s bicycle.
Little I knew this is actually a test that psychologists use to demonstrate how our brain sometimes tricks us into thinking we know something even though we don’t.
Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 VERTICAL GALLERIES (25)
I collected hundreds of drawings, building up a collection that I think is very precious. There is an incredible diversity of new typologies emerging from these crowd-sourced and technically error-driven drawings. A single designer could not invent so many new bike designs in 100 lifetimes and this is why  I look at this collection in such awe.
In 2016 I eventually decided it was my turn to take part in this project. I decided my job was going to be to present the potential and the beauty inside these sketches. I selected those that I found most interesting, genuine and diverse, then rendered them as if they were real. I became the executor of these two-minute projects by people who were mainly non-designers and confirmed my suspicion: everyone, regardless his age and job, can come up with extraordinary, wild, new and at times brilliant inventions.
Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (4)

What is the creative process behind your art?

Velocipedia began as a collection and I really did’t have a purpose for doing it. At some point I understood I was gathering some great material for what is called a crowd-sourced project. Many projects of this kind are aimed at making the exact average of the collected materials, but I thought each and every one of the bikes I was receiving had unique features that needed to be brought to attention rather than merged together into a single design.

In general it would not be easy to say what’s the thinking behind my projects. I like them to be meaningful, that’s for sure. I know I tend to work by association of ideas and that my love for puns always comes up. My coin box for BVR and Ciro Minimo for Helios Automazioni would be two good examples of how play on words influences my designs.Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (6)

How do you dismiss all the conflicting thoughts in your head and focus on  the singular process of creation?

I teach product design in University. I think the best exercise for me is doing this together with my students on their projects. It makes the process much more natural when it comes to my own because I do it so many times together with them.

Give us a sneak-peek into your typical day. How does a ‘A Day In Life of Gianluca’ look like?

There is no rule and that is probably the best part. During the academic year I go to university twice a week and have lessons to prepare, exercises to mark and so on. I also started teaching in high school this year. When school is off  I might find myself for a month in a row inside a big studio working as a consultant on some big project. In between these occupations I carry on other client work and personal projects. Probably what is common to my days is that I don’t spare a lot of time.

What do you feel when you stare at a blank page, before your art take shape on the whiteness of the sheet?

I feel the horror of vacuity. That’s why I need to feel my concept is strong and why I use puns to find an appropriate shape. For many designers styling is more like a final phase of the so called creative process and it can have nothing to do with the function or the meaning of the object. I feel I’m not able to do that.

If someone issues a search warrant through your tools and sketchbooks, what are they likely to stumble into?

A PC first of all, then a smart phone full of pictures I take at things that somehow inspire me (I spent some time publishing some of these pictures last year); and then objects I gather in flea markets and at times use to develop prototypes (this is a different kind of process I use, in which I overcome the horror of the white sheet letting that the shape or part of the shape be determined by something that I can’t control such as a found object). Other tools are linked to prototyping “the old fashioned way”: cutters, balsa wood, glue, plaster and so on.

Tell us more about projects. The one you mentioned are based between crossing the borders between product design, graphics and illustrations.

I think it has to do with the fact I wasn’t trained as a product or graphic designer. I studied as architect and that influences my mentality. I am at the opposite of a purist in any discipline. Also the fact of speaking more or less fluently two languages (Italian and English) and knowing a bit both of Italian and U.S. culture pushes me to look at things from more than one point of view…I guess.
This is a very minor project but I think it’s eloquent. I was asked to develop a cover design for a yearbook and ended up putting together a mock-up for a fictional product, just to make the cover design. The whole thing took me just 4 hours.
This other one, called Instalegs, went viral in 2013. It’s a physical object that I actually produced as a series, but it’s rather a satire that could have been made as  comic. I thought that actually making it would have been even funnier. It certainly would not have gotten all the attention if it had remained just a sketch.Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (3)What are your can’t-live-without stationery essentials?

I love the Pilot V5 because it’s dirty. It always messes up the drawing a bit. Purists of sketching tend to dislike it for the same reason. I also like very soft pencils: B6 is one of my most frequent choices. And I like drawing on scrap paper though it tends to get lost very easily on my messy desk.

Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (5)

Some stats: Total number of collected bicycle sketches: 376
Youngest participant: 3 years old
Oldest participant: 88 years old
Different nationalities of participants: 11
Bicycles facing left: 85 %
Bicycles facing right: 15 %

Gianluca Gimini - Velocipedia 1200 HORIZONTAL GALLERIES (14)

Fun facts collected during the making of this project:

Some diversities are gender driven. Nearly 90% of drawings in which the chain is attached to the front wheel (or both to the front and the rear) were made by females. On the other hand, while men generally tend to place the chain correctly, they are more keen to over-complicate the frame when they realize they are not drawing it correctly.

One of the most frequent issues for participants was not knowing exactly how to describe their job in short.

The most unintelligible drawing has also the most unintelligible handwriting. It was made by a doctor.

Gianluca Gimini is an Italian/American designer. As a professional he carries out projects of different nature often crossing the borders between product design, graphics, and illustration. He loves the communicational aspects of design and adds a humorous twist to whatever he does. He teaches product design at the University of Ferrara and occasionally writes in design magazines. He also helps big architecture firms convey their design projects to their clients.

Check out his projects here: http://www.gianlucagimini.it/

Portfolio: https://www.behance.net/GianlucaGimini

Blog: http://www.gianlucagimini.it/blog

Jungle Book’s heartwarming friendships and creative narrative

Director Jon Favreau’s beautiful, nostalgic and emotionally captivating adaptation of Rudyard Kipling’s Jungle Book once again brought to us a tender and mischievous story of a cute man-cub Mowgli and his animal hood.

One the biggest memories of watching the Jungle Book as a kid was the story of a perfect friendship it brought to life through its playful narrative. Of how the jungle was a perfect metaphor to the world that we live in – a place of plurality, friendships and the elements that preyed on your vulnerability. A place that could leave you immobilized from taking that first step towards new adventures.

the-jungle-bookSo boundless are these characters with wisdom and game that when we watch the movie, we become a part of Mowgli’s adventures and reconcile with the enthusiasm that was once a big part of our childhood. The narrative extolled the importance of a curious spirit and the value of true friendships in a heartwarming and profound way.

“There was a lot of opportunity for emotion and comedy there.” “The dynamic is about somebody who doesn’t belong and wants a home. It’s very universal.” – Favreau

Oeo_kWoven into the Jungle Book story are some electrifying creative lessons.

In the jungle, faced with the predatory elements all around, you become the only custodian of your own ideas of right and wrong. Immobilized with fear you can either fight or run towards a safer place. But in the end, it’s only in the face of adversity that the world sees a great deal about your character.

The jungle and its laws teach you that a system, that is built by a pattern and rules can destroy your creative spirit. Here, in the Jungle Book, Baloo is the antithesis to this black and white existence. He is the creative soul of the forest and teaches Mowgli to be his own best self.

When Mowgli recites his Laws of the Jungle bit, “For the strength of the pack is the wolf, and the strength of the wolf is the pack”, Baloo dismisses it, “That’s not a song, that’s propaganda!”

Baloo then teaches Mowgli the song about the good life:

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In the book, Baloo is allowed at the Pack Council and teaches the wolf cubs about the Law of the Jungle. Besides sharing these maxims that are absolutely essential to Mowgli’s  survival, Baloo also gives him a taste of good things in life.

“Baloo told him that honey and nuts were just as pleasant to eat as raw meat.” (excerpts from the original book)”So Baloo, the Teacher of the Law, taught him the Wood and Water Laws: how to tell a rotten branch from a sound one; how to speak politely to the wild bees when he came upon a hive of them fifty feet above ground; what to say to Mang the Bat when he disturbed him in the branches at midday; and how to warn the water-snakes in the pools before he splashed down among them. None of the Jungle People like being disturbed and all are very ready to fly at an intruder.”

“So Baloo, the Teacher of the Law, taught him the Wood and Water Laws: how to tell a rotten branch from a sound one; how to speak politely to the wild bees when he came upon a hive of them fifty feet above ground; what to say to Mang the Bat when he disturbed him in the branches at midday; and how to warn the water-snakes in the pools before he splashed down among them. None of the Jungle People like being disturbed and all are very ready to fly at an intruder.”

Their friendship is an essential part of the book. The image of Baloo and Mowgli floating down the river stream is so sweet — a kind of special bond of which only the creative, the marginalized, and the wild ones have the privilege of experiencing.

Ken Anderson and background painter Al Dempster were behind the work of the character sketches and the colour selection at Disney.
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Here is the same frame, in the nostalgia-plying anime cartoon series that marked the Sundays of our lives.
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And then the 2016 movie.
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Robert Legato and Andy Jones in collaboration  with the animators at the Moving Picture Company (MPC)  and Weta Digital brought the animals and the Jungle Book story to life. Favreau and his team tapped all the latest innovations in green-screen technologies and motion-capture for this movie.

Before the Favreau’s movie and before the cartoon anime series, we also got a glimpse of the Jungle Book and the various characters illustrated by Christopher Wormellcreate. These illustrations echo the various plots and characters of the story and assert the fact that interpreting a masterpiece in all its sights and sounds and rendering the tale with a pencil and a blank page is a truly beautiful task.

There were other illustrators too, who brought the book to life keeping the artistic integrity of the book and its plot.

We find the movie’s artistic cinematography in the visual direction of Sergey Artyushenko’s beautiful sketches.

Early sketches of characters from Disney’s The Jungle Book. Photo Credit: Disney.

Milt Kahl is an animator for the Disney studio and his drawing of Mowgli and Bagheera are as charming as they are life-like.

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As I researched more about the sketches and illustrations, I came across a gem of a site. Andreas Deja‘s YouTube channel and blog reveal the brief on the Jungle Book’s hand drawn character animation. Andreas spent 30 years at Disney and his blog is nothing short of a hidden gem for those wanting to learn more about the old style of hand drawn animations and collaborations done to get the best out of the color schemes.
“This animation assignment represents a strong creative comeback for animator Ollie Johnston, who recovered from an illness in the early 1960ies. There is no doubt whatsoever who this bear is, after only a few scenes Ollie nails the character.  Spectacular body language and brilliantly timed acting.
Frank Thomas takes over when Mowgli turns away from Baloo: “Leave me alone!”
This encourages the bear even more to cheer up the kid and to make him feel better.
It’s time he learned to fight like a bear and roar like a bear. The beginning of a beautiful friendship.
Frank’s Baloo feels a little heavier than Ollie’s, but the difference is only slight, and audiences would never notice. The acting is so consistently great from one animator to the other that it feels like one mind is behind this sequence.
Milt Kahl gave Frank and Ollie a hand with a few refined drawings that added appeal and helped to solidify the design of both characters.
Long live hand drawn character animation, an art form led by American artists for 100 years. We’ll see where this medium will go from here and where it will be cherished and renewed. “
 SCRIPT CREDITS
Typed by:
Sergei Zubkov, FDC Tummi/FDCmuck Cubbi
cubbi@comp.chem.msu.su, cubbi@org.chem.msu.su, 2:5020/315.17@Fidonet
EXCERPT PROVIDED BY INSIGHT EDITIONS FROM THE ART OF THE JUNGLE BOOK. © 2016 DISNEY.

David Bowie and Artistic Suicide

1263880_10151603205387665_1352405099_oOn Sunday, the world lost the greatest artist, singer and songwriter – David Bowie. For many of us, we lost a hero, an artist, and a renegade.

Few artists and musicians have been able to straddle the world of theatrics and musical nexus as powerful as David Bowie. David showed us how fearlessness and theatrics work together in creating the most powerful and potent art form. Hinged on role-subversions, alter-ego hopping and artistic exhibitionism, his style continues to inspire stage art, costumes, magazine covers and so many other spaces of artistic creations. Everywhere you look today, there are a million memories, infinite experiences, and about dozens of inspired reincarnations of Bowie.

But to be inspired by David Bowie’s work is to find ways to break away from the patterns that get cemented into the fabric of our lifestyle (and sometimes our artist expression). To be inspired by David Bowie’s work is to remember his restless curiosity that sought change from the time and again. Change that did not fear transgression into the boundaries of race, sex and class. Change that is the death of all things known. ‘Artistic suicide’ as they famously call it. And last but not the least, to remember that the theatrics that empowers our art must be fueled by emotions and not by virility of the medium. Ironically, the art that shakes the foundation of the very construct of norms and patterns often gives birth to a concrete concept that gets regurgitated over and over in different ways. That is exactly what David Bowie was not. Restless change, nonconformity and artistic courage is what remains truly under the layers of his art. Rest is great packaging and mastering reinvention.

Artistic suicide is an interesting study. It is a process where an artist sheds his mould to be reborn as something completely different. David Bowie shed his alter egos – Major Tom, Ziggy Stardust, Alladin Sane, Thin White Duke to become a new movement. This way, an artist gets beyond the carnival of rusting fan nostalgia and repetitive glory to create a blank space for a new style to emerge.

If an artist is more than a sum of his parts, the parts that inspired him never truly make him what he/she is. You can never put together these parts to resurrect the artist. But to drown in those million parts can help us get a little closer to the artist that became. And in a way hope to resurface back with him.

So after shuffling through our favourite David Bowie songs here is something more to absorb. David Bowie’s official Facebook fan page has a compilation of his Top 100 Books to read (listed below). His favourite books are as fascinatingly diverse as his alter-egos. I am starting with ‘Writers At Work: The Paris Review Interviews edited by Malcolm Cowley’.

David Bowie’s Top 100 Books

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Interviews With Francis Bacon by David Sylvester
Billy Liar by Keith Waterhouse
Room At The Top by John Braine
On Having No Head by Douglass Harding
Kafka Was The Rage by Anatole Broyard
A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess
City Of Night by John Rechy
The Brief Wondrous Life Of Oscar Wao by Junot Diaz
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Iliad by Homer
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
Tadanori Yokoo by Tadanori Yokoo
Berlin Alexanderplatz by Alfred Döblin
Inside The Whale And Other Essays by George Orwell
Mr. Norris Changes Trains by Christopher Isherwood
Halls Dictionary Of Subjects And Symbols In Art by James A. Hall
David Bomberg by Richard Cork
Blast by Wyndham Lewis
Passing by Nella Larson
Beyond The Brillo Box by Arthur C. Danto
The Origin Of Consciousness In The Breakdown Of The Bicameral Mind by Julian Jaynes
In Bluebeard’s Castle by George Steiner
Hawksmoor by Peter Ackroyd
The Divided Self by R. D. Laing
The Stranger by Albert Camus
Infants Of The Spring by Wallace Thurman
The Quest For Christa T by Christa Wolf
The Songlines by Bruce Chatwin
Nights At The Circus by Angela Carter
The Master And Margarita by Mikhail Bulgakov
The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodieby Muriel Spark
Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov
Herzog by Saul Bellow
Puckoon by Spike Milligan
Black Boy by Richard Wright
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
The Sailor Who Fell From Grace With The Sea by Yukio Mishima
Darkness At Noon by Arthur Koestler
The Waste Land by T.S. Elliot
McTeague by Frank Norris
Money by Martin Amis
The Outsider by Colin Wilson
Strange People by Frank Edwards
English Journey by J.B. Priestley
A Confederacy Of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
The Day Of The Locust by Nathanael West
1984 by George Orwell
The Life And Times Of Little Richard by Charles White
Awopbopaloobop Alopbamboom: The Golden Age of Rock by Nik Cohn
Mystery Train by Greil Marcus
Beano (comic, ’50s)
Raw (comic, ’80s)
White Noise by Don DeLillo
Sweet Soul Music: Rhythm And Blues And The Southern Dream Of Freedom by Peter Guralnick
Silence: Lectures And Writing by John Cage
Writers At Work: The Paris Review Interviews edited by Malcolm Cowley
The Sound Of The City: The Rise Of Rock And Roll by Charlie Gillete
Octobriana And The Russian Underground by Peter Sadecky
The Street by Ann Petry
Wonder Boys by Michael Chabon
Last Exit To Brooklyn By Hubert Selby, Jr.
A People’s History Of The United States by Howard Zinn
The Age Of American Unreason by Susan Jacoby
Metropolitan Life by Fran Lebowitz
The Coast Of Utopia by Tom Stoppard
The Bridge by Hart Crane
All The Emperor’s Horses by David Kidd
Fingersmith by Sarah Waters
Earthly Powers by Anthony Burgess
The 42nd Parallel by John Dos Passos
Tales Of Beatnik Glory by Ed Saunders
The Bird Artist by Howard Norman
Nowhere To Run The Story Of Soul Music by Gerri Hirshey
Before The Deluge by Otto Friedrich
Sexual Personae: Art And Decadence From Nefertiti To Emily Dickinson by Camille Paglia
The American Way Of Death by Jessica Mitford
In Cold Blood by Truman Capote
Lady Chatterly’s Lover by D.H. Lawrence
Teenage by Jon Savage
Vile Bodies by Evelyn Waugh
The Hidden Persuaders by Vance Packard
The Fire Next Time by James Baldwin
Viz (comic, early ’80s)
Private Eye (satirical magazine, ’60s – ’80s)
Selected Poems by Frank O’Hara
The Trial Of Henry Kissinger by Christopher Hitchens
Flaubert’s Parrot by Julian Barnes
Maldodor by Comte de Lautréamont
On The Road by Jack Kerouac
Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonders by Lawrence Weschler
Zanoni by Edward Bulwer-Lytton
Transcendental Magic, Its Doctine and Ritual by Eliphas Lévi
The Gnostic Gospels by Elaine Pagels
The Leopard by Giusseppe Di Lampedusa
Inferno by Dante Alighieri
A Grave For A Dolphin by Alberto Denti di Pirajno
The Insult by Rupert Thomson
In Between The Sheets by Ian McEwan
A People’s Tragedy by Orlando Figes
Journey Into The Whirlwind by Eugenia Ginzburg
Goodbye Bowie. Goodbye Aladdin Sane. Goodbye Major Tom. Goodbye Ziggy Stardust. Goodbye Halloween Jack. Goodbye The Thin White Duke.

We will be dying to see the next avatar you will be turning into. Call it a futuristic nostalgia. We don’t know what it will be or where it will be. But as you promised, we know, it sure won’t be boring.